How To Develop Your New Product Launch Strategy For Massive Paydays

In your quest to launch a successful product in the marketplace, you need a new product launch strategy that will guide you to success. Launching a product requires meticulous planning, coordination and a start-to-finish strategy that will act as your guide as to what to do next. Sure, Murphy’s Law will come into play and things will go wrong, and that’s why having a strategy to keep you on track and focused is even more important.Here’s how you can develop your new product launch strategy to rake in paydays that you never thought possible:Step 1 – Understand Your MarketBefore even creating your product, you need to understand your market’s wants and needs. If you just create a product that you ‘feel’ is going to be a hit, chances are it won’t. You need to study what the market’s problems are, what solutions they are crying out for. You need to understand their habits, their income range, their personalities, and so on. Find out which market you are targeting and study that market so you can come up with a solution to their problem/s.Step 2 – Create Your ProductThere are three options when it comes to having a product you can launch – you can create it yourself, you can outsource it or you can source it. Another consideration is the type of product you are creating. Is it an ebook, video course, software, or a physical tool? You are more likely to create and outsource an information product and source out a physical product from a supplier. Of course, you can also create your own brand new physical product that is sold under your brand. This requires more resources such as money, contacts and expertise.Step 3 – Do A Test LaunchBefore you launch your product to the general public, it is a good idea to do a small test launch first to see if your product idea is viable. In the online space, this can mean doing a launch to only your e-list of subscribers and customers, or even just a sub-list (a section of your list). In the offline world, this often entails launching your product to only a certain geographical area before you launch it statewide, countrywide or even worldwide.Step 4 – Test, Track and TweakTest and track the results of your promotion in your test launch. Things to test include elements of your sales copy such as your headline, call-to-action, colors etc. You can also gather feedback from beta testers or customers from the test launch to improve your product further. Keep tweaking your product offer to improve it before you roll it to the general public.Step 5 – Build RelationshipsRelationships are almost everything in business. If you have relationships with the right people and companies, your company and brand can grow very fast. Before you can rollout your product, you will want to build relationships with potential joint venture partners through contact points like email, Facebook, Skype and even direct mail so they will be more receptive to promoting your product.Step 6 – Roll Out Your ProductOnce all the talking and planning is done, it is finally time to rollout your product. This can involve starting your large-scale advertising campaign and/or having your joint venture partners promote your product to their mailing lists, either online or offline, or even both. A rollout involves using a lot of leverage, either through media channels or through other marketers’ lists. You rollout your product by leveraging on the built-in readers through these channels.Developing your new product launch strategy is not something which you can afford to do in a hurry. Take your time, consider every angle, and your product launch can be a rip-roaring success.

Why So Many Women Love To Wear High Heel Shoes

Women love high heeled shoes. It does not matter what their doctors say about the damage they can do to their feet. Fear of deformities like bunions caused by the foot sliding down into the shoe and cramping the big toe, might cause a woman to wear flats for casual events. For dress-up occasions, she will always come back to high heeled shoes. That is because no other shoe could make her feel sexier.Women do not agree on what should qualify as high heeled shoes. People who are not accustomed to wearing high heeled shoes may feel that a two or three inch heel is plenty high. With a heel of this height, walking and standing are not overly painful. At the same time, women can have some of the aesthetic benefits of wearing high heeled shoes. Some women will buy a pair of heels that are four inches or taller for special occasions. Because these shoes are so uncomfortable, women rarely wear them for long. The main exceptions are people who are in the entertainment industry.One reason women like to wear high heeled shoes is because they like to make themselves taller. Shorter women like to wear high heeled shoes to stand more equal to everyone else. The affect of the taller heels is to make the legs look longer. The length makes legs look supple and sensuous. This illusion is furthered because the definition of the calf muscles stands out. Because high heeled shoes make women’s legs look so shapely, even tall women want to wear them.There are other ways that high heeled shoes make a woman’s body more appealing. They change the whole posture a woman displays. While wearing high heeled shoes, a woman’s curves are more pronounced because of the positions of her derriere and chest. She also walks differently, with her hips moving gracefully. High heeled shoes not only make a women look better. She feels sexier wearing them as well. This can be seen in the confidence that is seen in women who wear high heeled shoes. They move with a smooth sexuality that women in flat soled shoes rarely show.Women wear high heeled shoes in a number of different situations. Parties and nights on the town, of course, are good places to wear heels. Business wear is popular in certain occupations. Bringing an air of feminine authority and visual height, high heeled shoes can make an impact in the boardroom. Yet, the impression is so subtle business associates will probably never know why the feel the way they do.The heels women wear the most are smart black high heeled shoes. Different people prefer different heights, but the lower heels are more common. They can be worn to a larger variety of occasions such as to work, to dinner parties, and even to more reserved events such as church or funerals. The high black heel is the sexiest of the heels. Stiletto heels may be difficult to walk in, but the look is fabulous. Other types of heels, such as the tapered heel or the block heel make the leg look different. Women wear these shoes to be in style and to show a level of sophistication that they never can in flat soled shoes.

Alternative Financing Vs. Venture Capital: Which Option Is Best for Boosting Working Capital?

There are several potential financing options available to cash-strapped businesses that need a healthy dose of working capital. A bank loan or line of credit is often the first option that owners think of – and for businesses that qualify, this may be the best option.

In today’s uncertain business, economic and regulatory environment, qualifying for a bank loan can be difficult – especially for start-up companies and those that have experienced any type of financial difficulty. Sometimes, owners of businesses that don’t qualify for a bank loan decide that seeking venture capital or bringing on equity investors are other viable options.

But are they really? While there are some potential benefits to bringing venture capital and so-called “angel” investors into your business, there are drawbacks as well. Unfortunately, owners sometimes don’t think about these drawbacks until the ink has dried on a contract with a venture capitalist or angel investor – and it’s too late to back out of the deal.

Different Types of Financing

One problem with bringing in equity investors to help provide a working capital boost is that working capital and equity are really two different types of financing.

Working capital – or the money that is used to pay business expenses incurred during the time lag until cash from sales (or accounts receivable) is collected – is short-term in nature, so it should be financed via a short-term financing tool. Equity, however, should generally be used to finance rapid growth, business expansion, acquisitions or the purchase of long-term assets, which are defined as assets that are repaid over more than one 12-month business cycle.

But the biggest drawback to bringing equity investors into your business is a potential loss of control. When you sell equity (or shares) in your business to venture capitalists or angels, you are giving up a percentage of ownership in your business, and you may be doing so at an inopportune time. With this dilution of ownership most often comes a loss of control over some or all of the most important business decisions that must be made.

Sometimes, owners are enticed to sell equity by the fact that there is little (if any) out-of-pocket expense. Unlike debt financing, you don’t usually pay interest with equity financing. The equity investor gains its return via the ownership stake gained in your business. But the long-term “cost” of selling equity is always much higher than the short-term cost of debt, in terms of both actual cash cost as well as soft costs like the loss of control and stewardship of your company and the potential future value of the ownership shares that are sold.

Alternative Financing Solutions

But what if your business needs working capital and you don’t qualify for a bank loan or line of credit? Alternative financing solutions are often appropriate for injecting working capital into businesses in this situation. Three of the most common types of alternative financing used by such businesses are:

1. Full-Service Factoring – Businesses sell outstanding accounts receivable on an ongoing basis to a commercial finance (or factoring) company at a discount. The factoring company then manages the receivable until it is paid. Factoring is a well-established and accepted method of temporary alternative finance that is especially well-suited for rapidly growing companies and those with customer concentrations.

2. Accounts Receivable (A/R) Financing – A/R financing is an ideal solution for companies that are not yet bankable but have a stable financial condition and a more diverse customer base. Here, the business provides details on all accounts receivable and pledges those assets as collateral. The proceeds of those receivables are sent to a lockbox while the finance company calculates a borrowing base to determine the amount the company can borrow. When the borrower needs money, it makes an advance request and the finance company advances money using a percentage of the accounts receivable.

3. Asset-Based Lending (ABL) – This is a credit facility secured by all of a company’s assets, which may include A/R, equipment and inventory. Unlike with factoring, the business continues to manage and collect its own receivables and submits collateral reports on an ongoing basis to the finance company, which will review and periodically audit the reports.

In addition to providing working capital and enabling owners to maintain business control, alternative financing may provide other benefits as well:

It’s easy to determine the exact cost of financing and obtain an increase.
Professional collateral management can be included depending on the facility type and the lender.
Real-time, online interactive reporting is often available.
It may provide the business with access to more capital.
It’s flexible – financing ebbs and flows with the business’ needs.
It’s important to note that there are some circumstances in which equity is a viable and attractive financing solution. This is especially true in cases of business expansion and acquisition and new product launches – these are capital needs that are not generally well suited to debt financing. However, equity is not usually the appropriate financing solution to solve a working capital problem or help plug a cash-flow gap.

A Precious Commodity

Remember that business equity is a precious commodity that should only be considered under the right circumstances and at the right time. When equity financing is sought, ideally this should be done at a time when the company has good growth prospects and a significant cash need for this growth. Ideally, majority ownership (and thus, absolute control) should remain with the company founder(s).

Alternative financing solutions like factoring, A/R financing and ABL can provide the working capital boost many cash-strapped businesses that don’t qualify for bank financing need – without diluting ownership and possibly giving up business control at an inopportune time for the owner. If and when these companies become bankable later, it’s often an easy transition to a traditional bank line of credit. Your banker may be able to refer you to a commercial finance company that can offer the right type of alternative financing solution for your particular situation.

Taking the time to understand all the different financing options available to your business, and the pros and cons of each, is the best way to make sure you choose the best option for your business. The use of alternative financing can help your company grow without diluting your ownership. After all, it’s your business – shouldn’t you keep as much of it as possible?